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The Neuron With No Clothes

And still the discourse continues without so much as a pause for reflection, hailing His Majesty the Neuron With no Clothes. Perhaps it is about time that we finally admit that the emperor is totally buck naked – and duly tell him, such that in the long run we save him from further embarrassment, when he is informed that his game is up.

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Why Hard Work May Be Needed To Live Your Bliss

So living your Bliss may require hard work and commitment. A lot of New Agers and dharma bums falsely believe that if it isn’t fun and ‘easy’, then it is not spiritual. Hard work will be a part of the journey if you want to reach mastery in most fields.

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Are You Ready For the Coming Consciousness Revolution?

The thing is, precisely one week ago I awoke early in the morning and had a premonition about the outcome of the game. I often have these kinds of premonitory visions, as I have previously stated in my writings. The premonition of the game wasn’t so much a dream or a mind-movie. It was more a flash of immediate knowing, where information is pumped into the brain – from who knows where. In such experiences the knowing is immediate. It often requires no verbal input or sequencing of events. It’s just arrives uninvited, like a mysterious stanger knocking at your door than just as suddenly vanishing into the night.

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Can You Really Handle Conscious Transparency?

Imagine waking up, going online to your favourite news site and finding the following lead story.   Chaos! Information terror as Net IDs go public! Global information systems are in chaos today, in the wake of the world’s first case of information terror. Radical libertarian group FreeThink has claimed responsibility for the hacking of the…

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Review: The Way of a Seer

Recently I read Peter L Nelson’s semi-autobiographical book The Way of Seer. it is a wonderful addition to the literature on Integrated Intelligence. Here’s a review that I write on Amazon.com:

This is a very fine book. I enjoyed it immensely, and learned a great deal from it. My own journey has been quite similar to Peter’s, and I found The Way of the Seer to be of great value in confirming, clarifying and extending my own knowledge of non-ordinary perception. I think those wishing to explore this subject a little more from a more “intellectual” perspective will also get a great deal out of the book.

What I particularly liked about the book is the “scientific” approach to the subject matter, and the honesty of the author. Perhaps this way is not for everyone who works with the extended mind, but I think all “seers” will gain a great deal from such a “critical” approach. Peter is not so much interested in laying down dogmas and certainties, as problematising the way of the seer. He is sometimes critical of false or naive approaches to seeing, but I think this is a good thing.

This is not to say that the author doesn’t make direct and bold claims. The book is founded upon the conviction that the human mind is connected to a deeper stream of consciousness, and that the information that this provides for the individual can be practically applied. Further, as the author states, such a way of relating to people, the world and the cosmos is vital to helping us rediscover the connectivity that we have lost in our modern, economically-developed cultures.

The book begins by tracing the author’s early life, when he came to acknowledge that he was indeed a seer. There then follows a broad coverage of the tapestry of Peter’s life in relation to his seeing abilities. There are plenty of fascinating anecdotes of Peter’s spiritual intelligence, and these make the text fascinating at a personal level.

Towards the end of the book, Nelson begins to discuss the relationship between non-ordinary perception, science and modern society. I found this to be both interesting and valuable. There are some great references to more academic work, too, for those who wish to explore the subject in a more formal way.

The way of the seer is an important book. The world needs people with the courage to speak and write openly about this often-maligned area of human perception. Seeing deeply is not merely an interesting aside to the human story, like attending a psychic reading or playing with a ouija board when you have had a few too many drinks. I am in full agreement with the author that non-ordinary perception is central to rebalancing the greater story of our civilisation and our species. Well done to Peter L Nelson for an invaluable, fascinating and very readable contribution to human knowledge.